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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. we're not children who need to be parented or misguided, bitter clingers to guns and religion. we believe in our right to defend ourselves and our families with semiautomatic firearms technology. we believe that if neither the criminal nor the political class and their bodyguards and security people are limited by magazine capacity, we shouldn't be limited in our capacity either. >> you know, mayor, your thoughts. he is basically saying we got to arm people or allow them to be armed up to the armed power of the united states government. this is really something. this is about posse comitatus. this isn't about sportsmanship or about self-protection, it's about insurrection. it's about fighting the revenuers again. >> and he is totally misleading his people. he knows that anyone who works for the government in any capacity with the firearm is severely reviewed before they're allowed to touch a firearm. they are required to be skillful. they are required to report in. they are required to be held accountable for every use of that firearm, something that this man obviously would oppos
makes religion into an instrument of hatred like j.b. stoner, there are plenty of those. they are near the top of the list. c-span: here is the book. second in the three volume series by taylor branch. this one is called "pillar of fire america in the king years 1963-1965." thank you. >> guest: thank you, brian. >>> you are watching book tv on c-span2. tonight we are at the national press club in washington, d.c. for their annual authors night and we are pleased to be joined here by robert merry who is the author of "where they stand the american presidents in the eyes of voters and historians." mr. merry, do we tend to like our presidents? >> i think the american people love their presidents. they love the presidency. but when they have a president that has not succeeded to the judge a failure, they vary on sentimentally cast them aside and that is our system to read that is what they were invited to do by the founders and by the constitution. >> do we have a short patience? >> we understand the constitution gave them hiring and firing authority over these guys every four years. so th
that differentiate us, make us unique, whether it be gender or race or religion, all of these things fall aside when you're there putting the mission first and selflessly serving as that member of a team. i can tell you from my own fi t firsthand experience as well as the many, many people i've had the honor of serving with, whether in training or in a deployed setting, those things are not what's crossing your mind when you're operating. >> should there be jobs that are not open to women? i mean are there some positions that really women cannot do? >> i don't think so. i think that really you have to look at what are the qualifications, what are the standards necessary for a specific job that are already in place and opening those doors to anyone who has volunteered to serve our country, if they meet those standards, that should be the setting. i think we've heard from john mccain, for example. his concern about making sure that the high physical fitness standards are kept, and i agree. i think in some of these jobs that do require a great amount of physical fitness, those standards should not be
religion is to care for the widows and the orphans and jesus says at the last judgment it all comes down to how did you respond to the needs of the least of these. this is america at our best. at our best, we are a humble people and we remember the call to have passion for the least of these. that is why it's etched inside the sought of liberty give me your tired and poor, the send these the homeless to me. i lift my lamp beside the golden door. humility and compassion for the oh pressed are central to the heart and character and are meant to be central to the heart and character of this nation. the second thing we learn is the importance of having a vision. a professor retired from harvard business school noted tasks of any important leader are to cast a vision for the too much and to inspire people to pursue it. it has to be a clear picture of where we want to go, a preferred picture of the future. he led the slaves out of egypt but that was not enough. quickly they began to desire to go back to egypt. the wilderness was hard. he had to constantly remind them of the vision. he said her
is somewhat distressing, we are moving in our country to maybe a state religion which says anybody who believes homosexuality is biblically untrue is some kind of a pariah, and so we're forcing a religious belief on the catholics and on the muslims and all these religious groups who happen to believe that homosexuality's inappropriate. whatever each of you believe, you should be able to believe what you want to believe. but i don't think the government should force or a religion onto a nation of people where we've so held, clinged to our idea of religious freedom. someone has told me, and this is a high-level person who all of you know, he heads up one of the think tanks, that george soros has funded an organization which is now going into churches to tape sermons for the fact that going forward -- i believe it's section 501 and not necessarily 501(c)(3), but the bob jones university lost its tax exemption because they had a policy against interracial marriage. and that was against public policy. so what this section in the irs says, 501, if you are against public policy, your tax exem
is not israel. it's really radical slafm. it isn't exploitation and hijacking of an old honored religion. what we need to do is find a way, and this is something we have to work at, for people to understand the degree to which it's happening. and becoming in some places an excuse for their disfranchisement. for being deprived good government and economy and job and opportunity. one of our missions is not not let it be an excuse. so i think that carrying the banner of religious tolerance is critical. i know, we have raised that with president morsi. i have personally raised that with him. i think was the first american to meet with president morsi even before he knew he was a candidate. we talked about the need for the brotherhood to be able to respect the diversity of egypt. now that hasn't happened completely as much as we would like in the constitutional process, but as i said, that's an ongoing process. we need to work together in order try to do it. senator, you raised a central, central issue with respect what is happening to the politics of certain regions of the world, and it's gotten t
of an old and honored religion. and what we need to do is find a way -- and this is something we have to work at -- for people to understand the degree to what that is happening and how it has become an excuse for their disenfranchisement, for being deprived of good governance, for being deprived of a good economy, jobs and opportunity. one of our missions is to not let that be an excuse. so i think carrying the banner of religious tolerance and diversity and pluralism is critical. i know we have raised that with president morsi. i've personally raised that with him. i think i was the first american to meet with him before he became -- before he even knew he was a candidate. and we talked about the need for the brother had to be able to respect the diversity of egypt. that has not happened completely as much as we would like in the constitutional process. but, as i said, that is an ongoing process and we need to work together in order to try to do it. but, senator, you've raised a central issue with respect to what is happening to politics of certain regions of the world. and it has t
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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